• HealthBeat: Energy drinks versus energy

    Posted by messie harris at 1/10/2013

    HealthBeat: Energy drinks versus energy

    A study indicates energy drinks, which can have the caffeine of up to three cups of coffee, can have a boomerang effect on a person’s ability to stay awake. At the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Robin Toblin looked at survey data on service members in Afghan war zones. She says those who had at least three energy drinks a day reported falling asleep more often on guard duty and in briefings than did troops who drank fewer.
    Toblin advises troops and civilians alike:
    “Use these in moderation, both in the number of drinks someone is having, as well as the size of the container, which can really range from about 8 ounces all the way to 24 ounces.”
    The study was in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    Learn more at healthfinder.gov.

    http://www.hhs.gov/news/healthbeat/2013/01/20130110a.html
     
     
     
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  • Flu Season 2013

    Posted by messie harris at 1/9/2013
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  • Protect Yourself From the Flu

    Posted by messie harris at 1/3/2013 2:00:00 PM
     

    KEEP YOUR GERMS FROM SPREADING


    WASH YOUR HANDS OFTEN AND WELL WITH SOAP AND WATER OR USE ALCOHOL-BASED HAND SANITIZERS.


    COVERYOUR MOUTH AND NOSE WHEN YOU COUGH OR SNEEZE. COVER YOUR SNEEZE OR COUGH WITH A TISSUE.


    STAY HOME IF YOU ARE SICK.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION: www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/qa.htm

     
      

     

     

     

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  • Illness 101

    Posted by messie harris at 1/3/2013 12:00:00 PM

     







    NURSES NOTES

     

    Things to keep in mind


    Viral and bacterial infections spread easily from person to person in fluids from the nose, mouth, and throat of someone with the infection, especially through large droplets from coughs and sneezes.

    Students and staff need to remember

    The best prevention is with good hygiene.

    Hand washing

    Cover the cough or sneeze.

    Stay home if you are sick.


    • Be familiar with the following ACS board policies.

    http://www.averyschools.net

    ACS Fever Policy # 6128

    ACS Contagious Illness policy #6122

    • Follow the CDC guidelines for illness at school.

    http://www.cdc.gov/flu/school/

    http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/habits/

    • Cover the cough

    http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/covercough.htm

    • Good hand-washing

    http://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/

    • Follow recommendations for hand sanitizer use.

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hand-washing/HQ00407/NSECTIONGROUP=2

    • Refer to the School Health Services Website for information and web links.

    http://www.averyschools.net


    Flu Vaccines

    For those who did not receive a flu vaccine in the fall. Vaccines are still available and it is not too late

    Flu Vaccines are available at the Avery Co Health Department

    Fifth Disease

    Fifth is a viral illness A classic sign of Fifth is a rash on the cheeks this may last for greater than a week. Fifth is most contagious before the rash appears either during the incubation period or when experiencing only mild respiratory symptoms. The Student is not contagious once the rash is present. A virus is not treated with an antibiotic.

    Strep Throat,Scarlet Fever, Scarlatina,

    Strep throat is caused by an infection with group A streptococcus bacteria. This infection presents with sore throat, fever 101* or greater, head ache and/or stomach ache. If untreated a scarlet-colored rash that looks like a bad sunburn and feels rough may appear. This is called Scarlet fever or Scarlatina. All Streptococcus infections should be treated by a healthcare provider.



    Is It a Cold or the Flu?

    The cold and flu are both respiratory illnesses, but they are caused by different types of viruses with different symptoms. Use this chart to learn the difference between the two.

     

    Signs and Symptoms

    Influenza

    Cold

    Fever

    Usually present

    Rare

    Aches

    Usual, often severe

    Slight

    Chills

    Fairly common

    Uncommon

    Tiredness

    Moderate to severe

    Mild

    Symptom onset

    Symptoms can appear within 3 to 6 hours

    Symptoms appear gradually

    Coughing

    Dry, unproductive cough

    Hacking, productive cough

    Sneezing

    Uncommon

    Common

    Stuffy nose

    Uncommon

    Common

    Sore throat

    Uncommon

    Common

    Chest discomfort

    Often severe

    Mild to moderate

    Headache

    Common

    Uncommon

     


    http://www.flufacts.com/know/what-is.jsp

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  • Protect Yourself, Your Family and Community

    Posted by messie harris at 1/3/2013 10:00:00 AM

     

    Emergency Warning Signs


    If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.


    Emergency warning signs in children that need urgent medical attention include:


    • Fast breathing or trouble breathing

    • Bluish or gray skin color

    • Not drinking enough fluids

    • Severe or persistent vomiting

    • Not waking up or no interaction

    • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held

    • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough


    Emergency warning signs in adults that need urgent medical attention include:


    • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath

    • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen

    • Sudden dizziness

    • Confusion

    • Severe or persistent vomiting

    • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough


    Protect Yourself, Your Family and Community
     
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  • Asthma in Schools Update Information

    Posted by messie harris at 1/3/2013
    Students are allowed to carry inhalers on their person at school the follow does apply.  Contact your School Nurse for further information.
     
    115C-375.2.  Possession and self-administration of asthma medication
    by students with asthma or students subject to anaphylactic reactions,
    or both.

    (a)       Local boards of education shall adopt a policy authorizing a
    student with asthma or a student subject to anaphylactic reactions, or
    both, to possess and self-administer asthma medication on school
    property during the school day, at school-sponsored activities, or
    while in transit to or from school or school-sponsored events. As used
    in this section, "asthma medication" means a medicine prescribed for
    the treatment of asthma or anaphylactic reactions and includes a
    prescribed asthma inhaler or epinephrine auto-injector. The policy
    shall include a requirement that the student's parent or guardian
    provide to the school:

    (1)       Written authorization from the student's parent or guardian
    for the student to possess and self-administer asthma medication.

    (2)       A written statement from the student's health care
    practitioner verifying that the student has asthma or an allergy that
    could result in an anaphylactic reaction, or both, and that the health
    care practitioner prescribed medication for use on school property
    during the school day, at school-sponsored activities, or while in
    transit to or from school or school-sponsored events.

    (3)       A written statement from the student's health care
    practitioner who prescribed the asthma medication that the student
    understands, has been instructed in self-administration of the asthma
    medication, and has demonstrated the skill level necessary to use the
    asthma medication and any device that is necessary to administer the
    asthma medication.

    (4)       A written treatment plan and written emergency protocol
    formulated by the health care practitioner who prescribed the medicine
    for managing the student's asthma or anaphylaxis episodes and for
    medication use by the student.

    (5)       A statement provided by the school and signed by the
    student's parent or guardian acknowledging that the local school
    administrative unit and its employees and agents are not liable for an
    injury arising from a student's possession and self-administration of
    asthma medication.

    (6)       Other requirements necessary to comply with State and federal laws.

    (b)       The student must demonstrate to the school nurse, or the
    nurse's designee, the skill level necessary to use the asthma
    medication and any device that is necessary to administer the
    medication.

    (c)       The student's parent or guardian shall provide to the school
    backup asthma medication that shall be kept at the student's school in
    a location to which the student has immediate access in the event of
    an asthma or anaphylaxis emergency.

    (d)       Information provided to the school by the student's parent
    or guardian shall be kept on file at the student's school in a
    location easily accessible in the event of an asthma or anaphylaxis
    emergency.

    (e)       If a student uses asthma medication prescribed for the
    student in a manner other than as prescribed, a school may impose on
    the student disciplinary action according to the school's disciplinary
    policy. A school may not impose disciplinary action that limits or
    restricts the student's immediate access to the asthma medication.

    (f)        The requirement that permission granted for a student to
    possess and self-administer asthma medication shall be effective only
    for the same school and for 365 calendar days and must be renewed
    annually.

    (g)       No local board of education, nor its members, employees,
    designees, agents, or volunteers, shall be liable in civil damages to
    any party for any act authorized by this section, or for any omission
    relating to that act, unless that act or omission amounts to gross
    negligence, wanton conduct, or intentional wrongdoing. (2005-22, s. 1;
    2006-264, s. 57(b).)

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  • How Obesity Threatens our Future....NC ranks 10th

    Posted by messie harris at 2/3/2011 2:00:00 PM

    New Report: North Carolina Ranks Tenth Most Obese State in the Nation

    Washington, D.C. June 29, 2010 - North Carolina was named the tenth most obese state in the country, according to the seventh annual F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2010 report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The state's adult obesity rate is 29.4 percent, and, in North Carolina women are more obese than men at 29.7 percent. Now more than two-thirds of states (38) have adult obesity rates above 25 percent.
     
     
     
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  • Perscriptions and Teen Drug Abuse..Know the facts

    Posted by messie harris at 1/7/2011 1:00:00 PM
     
    Get Facts: Myth-Busting Facts
     
    Myth #1: Teen Prescription Drug Abuse Is Uncommon
    Fact

    The abuse of prescription medications among youth ages 12 to 17 is widespread.

    • Every day, 2,500 young people use a prescription pain reliever to get high for the first time.
    • More teens abuse prescription drugs than illegal drugs except marijuana.
    • 3.2 million high school students report that they have abused a prescription medication at least once in their lives.
    • One in five high school students has taken a prescription medication that was not prescribed for them by a doctor.

    Myth #2: Only Adults Abuse Prescription Medications

    Fact

    You may be surprised to learn that teenagers - even as young as 12 years old - abuse prescription drugs every day. Many young people access prescription drugs easily and perceive prescription medications to be less dangerous than other drugs.

    • Prescription drugs are the drug of choice among 12-to-13 year-olds.
    • One third of all new prescription drug abusers in 2006 were 12-to-17 year-olds.
    • 60 percent of teens (12-17) who have abused prescription painkillers first tried them before age 15.

    Myth #3: Taking Prescription Medications Is a Safe Way to Get High

    Fact

    When abused, prescription drugs can be equally as dangerous as illegal drugs.

    • 41 percent of teens believe that prescription drugs are safer to use than illegal drugs.
    • Unintentional poisoning deaths involving narcotics and hallucinogens increased 55 percent from 1999 to 2004. This is attributed mainly to prescription painkillers.
    • 32 percent of teens say they abuse prescription painkillers because they believe there are fewer side effects than street drugs.

    Myth #4: It's Difficult to Get Prescription Medications

    Fact

    Accessing prescription medications can be as easy as going into a parent's or family member's medicine cabinet, drawer or kitchen cupboard. Some teens get them from friends. For many young people, accessing prescription drugs can be free or inexpensive.

    • 65 percent of teens who abuse prescription pain relievers say they get them from friends and relatives.
    • More than three in five teens say prescription pain relievers are easy to get from a parent's medicine cabinet.
     
     
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  • Tobacco Facts

    Posted by messie harris at 3/31/2009 2:55:00 PM
    • Nine out of 10 regular smokers began using tobacco products before age 18.
    • The average teen smoker begins at age 13.
    • About 2/3 of teen smokers say they want to quit smoking.
    • Every day, 3,000 kids become addicted to tobacco products.
    • Almost 1,000 of them will die prematurely from tobacco- related disease.
    • Eighty-five percent of underage smokers purchase the three most heavily advertised Brands: Marlboro, Newport, or Camel.
    • After the Joe Camel cartoon campaign was introduced, Camel's market share among underage smokers jumped from 0.5% to 32.8%.
    • Fifty percent of kids 12 to 17 who smoke own at least one promotional item with a tobacco logo.
    • Nine out of 10 regular smokers began using tobacco products before age 18.
    • The average teen smoker begins at age 13.
    • About 2/3 of teen smokers say they want to quit smoking.
    • Every day, 3,000 kids become addicted to tobacco products.
    • Almost 1,000 of them will die prematurely from tobacco- related disease.
    • Eighty-five percent of underage smokers purchase the three most heavily advertised Brands: Marlboro, Newport, or Camel.
    • After the Joe Camel cartoon campaign was introduced, Camel's market share among underage smokers jumped from 0.5% to 32.8%.
    • Fifty percent of kids 12 to 17 who smoke own at least one promotional item with a tobacco logo.
    • Nine out of 10 regular smokers began using tobacco products before age 18.
    • The average teen smoker begins at age 13.
    • About 2/3 of teen smokers say they want to quit smoking.
    • Every day, 3,000 kids become addicted to tobacco products.
    • Almost 1,000 of them will die prematurely from tobacco- related disease.
    • Eighty-five percent of underage smokers purchase the three most heavily advertised Brands: Marlboro, Newport, or Camel.
    • After the Joe Camel cartoon campaign was introduced, Camel's market share among underage smokers jumped from 0.5% to 32.8%.
    • Fifty percent of kids 12 to 17 who smoke own at least one promotional item with a tobacco logo.

    http://www.gatordental.com/drugfree/nicotine.htm

     
    Avery County Schools offers a teen tobacco information/cessation program. 
     For more information contact Messie Harris, RN 387-6316 or messieharris@averyschools.net
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Last Modified on January 10, 2013